Keywords Chat - Interactive Fiction, Weds 3/1

Graduate student Zainab Younus will lead the next chat in the #Keywords series. Interactive Fiction is considered a form of born-digital literature and forerunner to contemporary narrative video games. Ranging from text based adventures, to commercial products in the 1980s and 1990s, to contemporary fan fiction in the present -- IF continues to fascinate reader/players and writer/programmers.

#Keywords Chats on Digital Culture aim to foster a conversation on diverse digital culture topics outside of the classroom. Participants join in the round table discussion, enjoy illuminating "demos" and benefit from the expertise of a student or faculty chat leader.

#Keywords - Chats on Digital Culture Series Launches for Spring 2017

The DHC launched the #Keywords (Chats in Digital Culture) with an exciting discussion on Machinima, led by graduate student Mark DiMauro. We had a wonderful discussion and shared some interesting examples.

The 14 attendees at our first session selected some topics for future discussions.

    Further Spring Events
  • 3/1 Interactive Fiction
  • 3/22 Flarf
  • 4/5 Glitch Aesthetics
  • 4/19 Quest Narrative

Keywords


The DHC is proud to announce #Keywords, an ongoing brown-bag lunch series this spring semester. #Keywords is an informal, educated discussion on key terms and language in use in the digital humanities today.Our hope is that through a brief introduction and informal conversation you can become better acquainted with this terminology, what it means, how it works, and why students find it important.No prior knowledge of any digital humanities topics are required to join in the conversation! We all hope to learn from one another and bring this knowledge into the classroom in the form of projects, handouts, and lesson plans.The first event will be hosted on Wed, Feb. 15 at noon in the Sutton third floor alcove. We'll be discussing Machinima, presented by Mark DiMauro. Food will be provided, so join us and let's talk about the future of the digital humanities!

Video 1, Video 2 - Machinima, Johns Hopkins Guide to Digital Media

Creative Coding Brings Together Art, Humanities, and Technology

Enthusiastic undergraduate and graduate students from Art and English worked with visitor Tony Duvfa to explore creative coding using Processing. The introductory workshop, co-sponsored by the Department of English exposed non-programmers to "sketching" with code.

Processing or P5.js is a language and programming approach developed at MIT that aims "to make coding accessible for artists, designers, educators, and beginners, and reinterprets this for today's web." Increasingly, this approach is also being adopted in the humanities as a means to develop "code-literacy" or to encourage what MIT Professor Nick Montfort, in a book by the title, calls "Exploratory Programming."

Whether employed for analytical purposes in the humanities or creative purposes in the arts, Processing enables novices to engage deeply in learning algorithmic thinking.

Based on the success of the workshop and enthusiasm of participants, members of the IUP community will be invited to join in regular meetings of a "Creative Coding Circle" which will begin meeting in Spring 2017.

Creative Coding - Coffee Talk and Workshop

Enlarge poster to print.

"Creative" or "Exploratory" coding involves teaching programming fundamentals to allow people outside of computer science to gain agency in the digital domain.

Through a Coffee Talk (Tues, 9am, Sutton 352) and a free, hands-on workshop (Weds, 9am, Sutton 352), Tomi Dufva invites members of the IUP community to become acquainted with the ways expression and the understanding of code can go together.

Tomi Dufva is co-founder of a school integrating coding an art for children. If you have interests in Video Game studies, Digital literature, Digital humanities or allied fields, please come to the Coffee Talk tomorrow morning or consider attending the hands-on workshop this Wednesday.

SHERWOOD DELIVERS KEYNOTE ON BORN DIGITAL-LITERATURE AND PEDAGOGY

Associate Professor Kenneth Sherwood delivered the keynote address “Born Digital-Literature and Pedagogy” for the Creative Writing Festival at Suffolk Community College, Long Island, New York, providing insights into the teaching of born digital literature to college students.

The conference for SCC faculty and students celebrates literature and the teaching of creative writing. Sherwood addressed the audience on the incorporation of born digital literature into the curriculum for creative writing and introductory literature classes. Born digital literature includes creative work that incorporates code in its composition and display.

Sherwood gave an overview of the varieties of born digital literature produced in the last two decades, related his teaching experiences from IUP classes (introduction to graduate level), and made the case for a read/write pedagogy in which students not only read digital literature but are taught to make it. The talk also featured a brief exhibition of works written and coded by IUP English students/graduates Eliza Albert, Melissa Clark, Andrew Chonoiski, Brian Humphreys, and Jessica Showalter.
Sherwood teaches in the IUP English Department and co-directs the Center for Digital Humanities and Culture. Courses he has designed or co-designed include the undergraduate course, ENGL 421 Digital Writing, and graduate courses ENGL 771/871 Postmodern Topics: Digital Literature, ENGL 781 Digital Literacy,and ENGL 757/857 Digital Composition, Literature and Pedagogy.

Learn more about the Ninth Annual SCCC Creative Writing Festival's
Conference Day 2016.

http://www.thecwfestivalatsccc.com

Distanced Sounding: Versioning Poems in the Digital Audio Archive

Kenneth Sherwood (English Department) delivered a presentation entitled "Distanced Sounding: Versioning Poems in the Digital Audio Archive" at the 2016 annual conference of the Modern Language Association, held this year from January 7 to 10 in Austin, Texas.

As part of a program on "Close and Distant Listening," Sherwood's research explores how the rise of audio archives invites new listening, research, and archiving strategies. Using a tool called ARLO, hosted on an NCSA supercomputer, Sherwood detailed a case study using visualization and the application of a structured vocabulary for tagging paralinguistic.

For more, view the MLA program https://apps.mla.org/program_details?prog_id=136&year=2016

or slides: http://bit.ly/MLA-DistList-Sherwood

Sherwood teaches graduate courses in the Digital Humanities at IUP and codirects the Center for Digital Humanities and Culture. http://www.iupdhc.org

Spreading the Word: Open Access Digital Scholarship in the 21st Century

Thurs, Nov. 12, 11am

The manner in which students and scholars produce and consume research has undergone a shift in recent decades. Expanded research territories, rich avenues for collaboration, and new paths for sharing knowledge abound. At the same time, questions remain for many about this new landscape, such as: What is the status of open access journals? What are the most professional ways for authors to leverage their rights to share research? What roles are available for libraries, university centers, departments, professional organizations, or individual scholars in promoting open access? How can the scholarly community navigate this landscape to accomplish our individual and collective goals?

Join us for a presentation by Josh Bolick (Scholarly Communications Librarian, Watson Library, University of Kansas) to learn more about institutional repositories, open access journals, and the present and future of digital scholarship. Mr. Bolick will introduce these topics from his experience as a scholarly communications librarian, address specific opportunities available to the IUP community, and respond to audience questions.

Format: 45 min presentation, 15 min Q&A

Location: (Stabley 201)
(Please RSVP - http://bit.ly/OpenAccessIUPEvent; refreshments will be served following the presentation)

Co-sponsors:
Center for Digital Humanities and Culture
IUP Libraries
Department of English Colloquium Series
School of Graduate Studies and Research

Advocating for Open Access

As part of Banned Books week at IUP, DHC Co-Director Ken Sherwood joined a panel of IUP faculty from English, Criminology, Political Science, and IT to discuss the case of Aaron Swartz, and efforts to open access to scholarly publications for researchers and students.

The slideshow for Dr. Sherwood's contribution, "Digital Progress," is available below:

The Center for Digital Humanities is currently supporting the development of Dr. Tanya Heflin's Open Access project on Women's Diaries, which will be featured on this site in coming months.

Sherwood Publishes on Distanced Sounding Investigations Using Computers


Kenneth Sherwood's article "Distanced Sounding: ARLO as a tool for the analysis and visualization of versioning phenomena within poetry audio" has been published by _Jacket 2_, a serial sponsored by the University of Pennsylvania Center for Programs in Contemporary Writing. In "Distanced Sounding," Sherwood outlines a research program for applying machine learning and computation to large scale questions posed by digital archives.

The article is available online and contributes to a series of working papers on experimental digital analyses of poetry audio: Jacket2

Sherwood is Associate Professor of English at IUP and co-director of the Center for Digital Humanities and Culture. He teaches poetics, avant-garde writing, and digital humanities in the doctoral program for Literature and Criticism.