Local DHC News

Aljayyousi Awarded DAAD grant for DH Project


Dr. Mohammad Aljayyousi, an IUP alumnus who got his PhD in Literature and Criticism with a dissertation focusing on Digital Humanities under the supervision of Dr. Ken Sherwood, has recently been awarded a DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service) short term grant in Digital Humanities for his project on the digitization of novels and the creation of pedagogical tools for English majors through the digital medium. He has started his fellowship at the Cologne Center of eHumanities (CCeH) in Cologne, Germany this October (http://cceh.uni-koeln.de/).

DHC Annual Report

The DHC submits an annual report on our center goals and achievements. For those wishing more information on our work this year, please review the attached report.

AY 2017 Report PDF

Weinstein presents on Teaching, the "Wiki Way"

At the 2017 College Technology day, DHC Co-director Dan Weinstein presented “Strategies for Teaching with Co-Editable Digital Documents.”
In this session Dr. Weinstein will discussed and demonstrated strategies for constructing engaging, collaborative learning experiences in such co-editable digital spaces as Google Sites, Google Docs, and similar tools. Applications for collaborative documents in primary,
secondary, and university settings were explored.

DHC Co-Sponsors Art+Feminism Wiki Edit-a-thon


Stapleton Library, in collaboration with Women and Gender Studies and the Center for Digital Humanities and Culture at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, hosted an Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon March 8, from 10:00am to 1:00pm, in 201 Stabley.

This 3-hour event improved coverage of women and the arts on Wikipedia and encourage female editorship.

IUP volunteers edited 15 articles. There were 74 total edits committed by 24 different editors.

The edit-a-thon included an introductory talk, tutorials for the beginner Wikipedian, ongoing editing support, reference materials, and refreshments.

In a 2011 survey, the Wikimedia Foundation found that less than 10% of its contributors identify as female. This lack of female participation has led to an alarming dearth of content about women and art in the world’s most popular online research tool.

Art+Feminism’s Edit-a-thons and other initiatives make an impact on the gender gap through crucial improvements to art and feminism related subjects on Wikipedia. Since 2014, over 280 Art+Feminism edit-a-thons have taken place across the work, creating and improving an estimated 4,600 articles.

Keywords


The DHC is proud to announce #Keywords, an ongoing brown-bag lunch series this spring semester. #Keywords is an informal, educated discussion on key terms and language in use in the digital humanities today.Our hope is that through a brief introduction and informal conversation you can become better acquainted with this terminology, what it means, how it works, and why students find it important.No prior knowledge of any digital humanities topics are required to join in the conversation! We all hope to learn from one another and bring this knowledge into the classroom in the form of projects, handouts, and lesson plans.The first event will be hosted on Wed, Feb. 15 at noon in the Sutton third floor alcove. We'll be discussing Machinima, presented by Mark DiMauro. Food will be provided, so join us and let's talk about the future of the digital humanities!

Video 1, Video 2 - Machinima, Johns Hopkins Guide to Digital Media

Sherwood Publishes on Distanced Sounding Investigations Using Computers


Kenneth Sherwood's article "Distanced Sounding: ARLO as a tool for the analysis and visualization of versioning phenomena within poetry audio" has been published by _Jacket 2_, a serial sponsored by the University of Pennsylvania Center for Programs in Contemporary Writing. In "Distanced Sounding," Sherwood outlines a research program for applying machine learning and computation to large scale questions posed by digital archives.

The article is available online and contributes to a series of working papers on experimental digital analyses of poetry audio: Jacket2

Sherwood is Associate Professor of English at IUP and co-director of the Center for Digital Humanities and Culture. He teaches poetics, avant-garde writing, and digital humanities in the doctoral program for Literature and Criticism.

Workshop - Software Freedom - Feb 10


Monday, Feb 10, 2014 - 12:15-1:15pm
Stabley 201

This workshop introduces participants to the DHC toolkit and explores the rationale for adopting open-source software solutions. Participant will ease into the open-source world using plugins for open browsers (Firefox / Chrome). There will be an opportunity for Questions/Answers and hands-on experimentation.

Presentation Slide Show

Schedule for the other six workshops.

DHC Recognizes IUP Students as HASTAC Scholars

The Center for Digital Humanities and Culture is pleased to recognize three IUP graduate students who have been named 2014 HASTAC Scholars. Adam Colton, Matthew Corran, and Wesley Dunning will participate in this network during the 2013-2014 academic year, under the local sponsorship of the IUP DHC. As HASTAC scholars, they will develop their graduate research projects in concert with fellow scholars from across the US and the world.

Sherwood Helps Shape Supercomputing Tool for Literary Analysis

Co-founder of the IUP Center for Digital Humanities and Culture, Dr. Kenneth Sherwood spent a week at UT Austin this past May as an invited participant in "High Performance Sound Technology for Access and Scholarship." This National Endowment for the Humanities-sponsored Institute for Advanced Topics in Digital Humanities centers involves an innovative use of supercomputers for the analysis of spoken word audio.